The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) is a federation of national associations of certified radio amateurs, representing over 150 countries and separate territories around the world.

The three IARU Regions are organised to broadly mirror the structure of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and its related regional telecommunications organisations. The Regions comprise:
- IARU Region 1: Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Northern Asia
- IARU Region 2: The Americas
- IARU Region 3: Asia-Pacific

The IARU represents the interests of the Amateur Radio Service worldwide to relevant international organisations, promoting the interests of amateur radio and seeking to protect and enhance its spectrum privileges.

International Amateur Radio Union - Region 1

10100-10150 kHz

The 30 meter band

7000-7200 kHz

The 40 meter band

Starting 29 March 2009 the band 7000-7200 kHz is allocated to the amateur service on a primary basis. Before that date many most European countries allowed their amateurs to operate in the band 7100-7200. This is known as Early Access.

What happened during WRC-03?

Under Agenda Item 1.23 WRC-03 tried to find a globally harmonised allocation of 300 kHz around 7 MHz for the Amateur Service. The outcome of WRC-03 was that only the segment 7000 - 7200 kHz will be globally harmonized from 2009. Before WRC-03 within CEPT the concept of "Early access" was adopted. The European Common Proposal EUR/13A23 for WRC-03 included a footnote that stated:

On condition that harmful interference is not caused to the broadcasting service, administrations may allow stations in the amateur service in Regions 1 and 3, from 1st January 2005 until April 2007, to use frequencies in the band 7100 – 7200 kHz on a secondary basis, using a total radiated power not exceeding 24dBW.

Reason for this footnote was that studies of the existing segment between 7100 and 7200 kHz during the summer broadcasting season indicates that there is little use of this segment by broadcast stations in Europe during daylight hours. Those stations that are active appear to be targeting programming into Eastern Europe and the Middle East and are unlikely to be caused interference by a low powered service operating in their transmitted signal null.

What do we see after WRC-03?

Although the footnote was not adopted by WRC-03 there is support for the principle from administrations within CEPT. In and outside Europe we see an increasing number of countries that allow amateurs to operate between 7.1 and 7.2 MHz

What is/was IARU Region 1 doing?

During the ECC Working Group Frequency Management (WGFM) Meeting in Budapest on 22 September 2004, IARU Region 1 proposed to allow amateur activity in the segment 7100 - 7200 kHz. The proposal got support from the administrations from Netherlands, Norway, Switzerland and United Kingdom. It was decided that the Dutch administration would draft a recommendation in this sense and that the recommendation will be considered at the next WGFM meeting in January 2005. During the months October and November 2004 The recommendation was drafted in close cooperation with IARU Region 1 and was on the agenda for the WGFM meeting held in Utrecht the Netherlands 24-28 January 2005. Because of very strong French opposition the proposal was not adopted and it was agreed that the Netherlands would chair a group which would work by correspondence with all concerned Administrations to try to resolve this issue between now and the next WG FM meeting (23 - 27 May 2005). On 23 February 2005 LA2RR and PB2T discussed the issue with the Dutch, French and Norwegian administrations and the French objection could be taken away. On 25 May 2005 WGFM adopted (for public consultation) a recommendation to allow early access. After public consultation WGFM at its meeting held in Koblenz adopted ECC/REC(05)05 on 28 September 2005.

Following countries allowed early access and/or implemented the change after 29 March 2009

CEPT countries

country
power
remarks
from
source
Austria
  
20060202
Belarus   20090514 
Belgium
 
secondary
20050901
Croatia
1000W
 
20031226
Cyprus
  
20041101
Czech Rep
250W
secondary
20050501
OK1MP
Denmark
  
20050101
France   pending 
Germany
250W
 
20060901
DARC
Greece   20090401 
Hungary
250W
secondary
20060525
HA5EA
Iceland
100W
 
20040419
 
Ireland
100W
 
20041020

Italy

250W

secondary

20080513

IZ0FMA

Liechtenstein
100W ERP
secondary
 
Malta
150W
secondary
20050912
9H1SP
Monaco
100W
 
20050608
Netherlands
250W
secondary
20060606
Staatscourant 20060608
Norway
100W
secondary
20040401
 
Poland
 
secondary
20050805
SP5HS
Portugal
 
special permission class A
 
REP Board
Russian Federation
1kW
 
20060427
San Marino
 
nib
20040225
ARRSM
Serbia&Montenegro
 
primary shared
 
National Allocation Table version 20040813
Slovakia
750W
primary
20050120
Slovenia
  
200606
 
Spain
250W
secondary20071124
URE
Switzerland
100W
secondary nib
20050101
United Kingdom
400W
 
20041031

Region 1 outside CEPT

country
power
remarks
from
source
Gibraltar
   
ZB2IF
Israel
250W
secondary
20040518
IARC
Namibia
 
secondary
20040420
Sao Tome
  
200509
 
Saudi Arabia
   
South Africa   20090610 
Syria
   
YK1AO

outside Region 1

country
power
remarks
from
source
Salomon islands
400W
 
200407
Bernhard Stefan, DL2GAC/H44MS)
Singapore
100W eirp
 
20050929
SARTS, 9V1CW
US territories R1&3
  
20050316

 

 

5250-5450 kHz

The 60 meter band

Updated 21st January 2017 by G3PSM, 23rd January 2017 by DK4VW

Status of 5.3 MHz band In Region 1

Andorra

Andorra’s previous 60m allocation 5275-5450 kHz was withdrawn last fall after WRC-15.

Starting with 2017 Andorra got a new allocation of 5351.5-5366.5 kHz with a maximum power of 15 W EIRP.

Bahrain

Bahrain has a channelized secondary allocation for all General Class (A9) licensees. The centre frequencies 5373 kHz and 5405 kHz are assigned on a non-interference basis for propagation experiments. Maximum bandwidth 3 kHz. Maximum mean power 27dbW (500W). The corresponding Upper Sideband (USB) voice 'dial' frequencies are 5371.5 kHz and 5403.5 kHz.

Belarus

On 16 July 2016 secondary allocation of the WRC-15 band (5351.5 - 5366.5 kHz) for holders of licence class A, all modes allowed (CW,SSB, Digital) with max. TX output of 50 W. (info EU1M) 

Belgium

Allocated 5351.5 - 5366.5 kHz from 1st March 2016 in line with WRC-15 decision.   All modes with a maximum 15 Watts EIRP. (Source BIPT)

Croatia

Croatia issues experimental licences for both VFO based and channelized operations in the band 5260-5410 kHz all mode (June 2010) The individual experimental licenses are yearly renewable. All modes are permitted. The Croatian amateur radio emergency service, HRSVKS, operates a 24/7 HF Pactor and ALE system (PCALE) which includes the frequencies 5260, 5371.5 and 5403.5 kHz. (Source: 9A5K Nov 2012)

Czech Republic

Approximately 10 amateurs held an experimental license to operate on 5260 kHz with 3 kHz BW with an ERP output of 100 W. The permission expired on 31 Dec 2011. (Source: OK1MP Nov 2012).

For 2014 ten operators received permits to use 5 MHz. The authorized SSB and CW frequencies are 5288.5, 5330.5, 5366.5, 5371.5, 5398.5 and 5403.5 kHz, with a maximum power of 100 watts ERP. (Source: OK1MP)

For 2015 there are no restrictions on the number of licences for 5 MHz and the number of channels have been increased.   These are now 5276, 5288.5, 5298, 5313, 5330.5, 5333, 5362, 5366.5, 5371.5, 5395, 5398.5 and 5403.5 kHz USB dial reading,  5277.5 5290, 5299.5, 5314.5, 5332, 5334.5,5363.5, 5368, 5373, 5395.6 5400 and 5405 kHz CW. (Source: OK1MP (CRC) and OK1RP)

For 2016 there are no restrictions on the number of licences for 5 MHz and have same channels as in last year: 5276, 5288.5, 5298, 5313, 5330.5,
5333, 5362, 5366.5, 5371.5, 5395, 5398.5 and 5403.5 kHz USB dial reading, 5277.5 5290, 5299.5, 5314.5, 5332, 5334.5,5363.5, 5368, 5373, 5395.6 5400
and 5405 kHz CW with an ERP output max. of 100 W.

Denmark, including Faroe Islands

Danish amateurs can opt for a renewable experimental license for an annual fee of DKR 300 and VFO operate in the band 5250.0 - 5450.0 kHz with 1 kW output, allmode. (updated 4 March 2012). An NVIS beacon OV1BCN operates on 5290.5 kHz. Effective 1 June 2012, the pilot scheme at 5 MHz will cease, and the area from 5250 to 5450 kHz may be used by holders of A and B Certificate with all modulation types with respectively 1000 and 100W maximum output power. Issued trial licenses are valid until expiry.

Finland

Frequencies: 5278.6 / 5288.6 / 5298.6 / 5330.6 / 5346.6 / 5366.6 / 5371.6 / 5398.6
Power: 50 Watts, mode: SSB and narrow band data
Limitations: Notice of Variation for club stations. (Source: OH2BR Nov 2012)

Germany

Since 20 December 2016 (early) access to WRC-15 band (5351.5 - 5366.5 kHz) for class A licence holders, 15 W eirp, all modes, max. bandwidth 2.7 kHz.

Propagation Beacon on 5195 with callsign DRA5

Greece

Greece has a single channel allocation for the RAAG clubstation SZ1SV operating on 5398.5 kHz. This station also operates in beacon mode. (Source: SV1IW Nov 2012)

Hungary

Hungary allows the use of 5318-5321 KHz on a secondary basis within the MOBILE service for emergency communications with NVIS antenna and 100W (source: NAT April 2013 Footnote H23A)

Iceland

Iceland has permitted Icelandic radio amateurs to use the following frequencies in USB and CW mode (USB dial frequencies in parentheses):
5280 (5278.5), 5290 (5288.5), 5332 (5330.5), 5348 (5346.5), 5368 (5366.5), 5373 (5371.5), 5400 (5398.5), 5405 (5403.5) kHz
These are the same frequencies allowed to be used by Norwegian amateur radio club stations. Maximum allowed transmit output power is 200 W. The permission is valid from 1 June 2005 to 31 December 2010. The Icelandic radio amateurs that wish to use 60 m must apply for a special licence from the Icelandic licensing authority. (Source: LA4LN and updated by TF2JB July 2010).

The permission has evolved into a band allocation 5260-5410 kHz for both VFO and channelized operation. The maximum power is 100 Watts (Source; G4MWO April 2012). These arrangements, that originally expired by the end of 2012 have been extended for 2013 and 2014. (source: TF3JB Jan 2013)

The current license period is two years, i.e. from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2016.
We are allowed 150 kHz, i.e. 5260-5410  kHz with VFO, on secondary basis; maximum power is 100W (ERP).
We are allowed  to use J3E (USB), A1A (CW) and 6OH0J2B (PSK-31); maximum transmit bandwidth is 3 kHz.
We need to apply for a special license which is valid for the 2 years. Both license classes, i.e. N and G have the same privileges. (Source: TF3JB Feb 2013)

Ireland

Since 22 December 2016 access to WRC-15 band (5351.5 - 5366.5 kHz), all modes with max. 15 W PEP.

With additional authorisation these spot frequencies may be used for special events or for temporary experimental purposes:

5.280 MHz;
5.300 MHz;
5.332 MHz;
5.348MHz;
5.400 MHz and
5.405 MHz

Modes: CW, SSB, PM with max. 200 w PEP.

Reference: Irish ComReg09/45R2  Date: 22nd December 2016

------

Following extensive contact with the military authorities by the Irish Amateur Radio Society (IRTS) it has now been agreed that for an initial period of a year four 3 kHz channels will be allocated to experimenters on a secondary and non interference basis in the 5MHz region. Individual applications will have to be made for permission to operate on these channels.
The 3 kHz channels are centred on 5280, 5290 (receive only), 5400 and 5405 kHz. The power limit will be 23 dBW (200 watts) to an antenna with not more than 0 dBd gain (e.g. a dipole). The permitted modes will be CW, USB and digital Modes. The USB carrier frequency will be 1.5 kHz on the low frequency side of the channel centre frequencies. Some or all of these channels are also in use in the UK, Iceland, Finland, Norway, Canada and the USA. It should be noted that three beacon stations in the UK operate on the 5290 kHz channel for three minutes in every fifteen minutes. These stations are GB3RAL, GB3WES and GB3ORK Care should be taken to avoid any interference with these propagation beacons. (November 2007)

Israel

In May 2013 the Isreali Ministry of Communications (IMOC) granted the use of 8 channels for General and Extra Class licencees.   These are available on an individual application basis until March 2014 when it is hoped and extension will be agreed.   Permitted power is 100 Watts PEP and channels are 3 kHz bandwidth and are USB dial frequencies.

Permitted channels and modes are

5298.5   CW RTTY PSK SSB (USB)

5330.5   CW SSB (USB)

5357      CW RTTY PSK SSB (USB)

5366.5   CW RTTY PSK SSB (USB)

5371.5   SSB (USB)

5398.5   CW RTTY PSK SSB (USB)

5403.5   CW RTTY PSK SSB (USB)

5407     CW RTTY PSK SSB (USB)

(Source: IARC May 2013)

Norway

5260 - 5410 kHz on secondary basis, all modes (6 kHz max bandwidth) with 100 Watts output.(Source: LA4LN Nov 2012)

Portugal

In June 2011 Anacom assigned 5288.5 kHz in addition to the already authorized frequencies of 5371.5 kHz and 5403.5 kHz on a secondary / non interference basis. The special propagation study permits were originally issued for a year. (Source: CT1EEB Nov 2012). A further frequency at 5380.5 kHz was granted to run from 4th July 2014 until 30th June 2015 (Source: CT1EEB July 2014)

From 1st October 2016 until 31 December 2016 the WRC-15 band (5351.5 - 5366.5 kHz) was permitted to use. A notice related to the further use is expected from ANACOM. (info CT1EEB)    

Slovenia

From 11 January 2017 access to WRC-15 band (5351.5 - 5366.5 kHz)  with 15 W eirp by special application for temporary usage [90 days].

Somalia

Band allocation 5060 – 5450 kHz, providing for both VFO and Channelized operations.  All modes are allowed and the maximum power permitted is 3 kW on a non-interference basis. Upper Sideband (USB) must be used.

South Africa

In April 2013 the South African regulator ICASA authorised the use of 5250 and 5260 kHz for propagation research purposes. The authorisation is valid for a 8 month period and licences cost 2,900 Rand. (Source: SARL April 2013)> The 5 260 kHz frequency was changed to 5 290 kHz. The authorisation has been extended to 13 December 2015, awaiting a decision from the Council of ICASA to extend it further.

Spain

The Spanish PTT has authorized the use of several frequencies in the 5 MHz (60 m) band from January 1st to June 30th, 2014. The authorized frequencies are 5268, 5295, 5313, 5382, 5430 and 5439 kHz, with a power of 100 W PEP. (Source URE 2 January 2014). This authorisation has now been extended until 30th November 2015. (Source: EA7OP via OK1RP and G4MWO). The access to the spot freqiuencies got withdrawn by the administration.

The WRC-15 band (5351.5 - 5366.5 kHz) was approved for 2016, modes SSB/CW only and 15 watts EIRP.

Since the new national band allocation table is still not approved by the Ministry, where the band will be allocated under a secondary basis, so on December 2016 another temporary period permit was released, granted for the whole year 2017. (info EA7KW).

Slovakia

All OM stations can use the band from 5258.5 to 5261.5 kHz with a maximum ERP power of 100 W ERP. The licences are valid for 1 year from date of issue. (Source: OM3LU Nov 2012)

Sweden

PTS (has now 17 January 2013) started to issue permits for experimental transmitters in the 5MHz band. Presently the following frequencies apply: 5310-5313 kHz, 5320-5323, 5380-5383 kHz and 5390-5393 kHz. Bandwith is limited to 3 kHz independent of type of modulation.

Maximum output power is 100 watt pep. Mobile use is not permitted. Holders of call sign for amateur radio may use their amateur radio call sign. It is permitted to make contact with other permit holders. This operation must respect all other traffic in the band. It is very important not to disturb other traffic.

PTS requires a fee for the administration. The permits are limited in time to 6 months."

From October 2016 the permission for the usage of the four segments (see above) has stopped and was replaced by the access to the WRC-15 band (5351.5  - 5366.5 kHz), but still special permits by PTS for a 6 month periode are needed.

United Kingdom

Frequencies (USB voice dial freqs): 5258.5 / 5278.5 / 5288.5 / 5366.5/5371.5/5398.5 / 5403.5 on a secondary NIB. (Until 31st December 2012)

Power: 200 Watts ERP

Limitations: Notice of Variation

From 1st January 2013 - (USB dial frequencies)

5258.5-5264, 5276-5284, 5288.5-5292, 5298-5307, 5313-5323, 5333-5338, 5354-5358, 5362-5374.5, 5378-5382, 5395-5401.5, 5403.5-5406.5 kHz

Power: 200W EiRP

Antenna: No higher than 20M above ground level

Maximum bandwidth of any transmission not to exceed 6 kHz

Operation permission by licence Notice of Variation issued by Ofcom on a NIB (Non Interference Basis) to primary users.

(updated by Colin J. Thomas, G3PSM on 12th December 2012)

Attention: Only the segments 5354 - 5358kHz and 5362 - 5366.5kHz are within the WRC-15 band (5351.5 - 5366.5 kHz).

 

Status of 5 MHz band Outside Region 1

Bangladesh

Band allocation 5250 – 5310 kHz, providing for both VFO and Channelized operations. Allocated to the amateur service on a Secondary, non-interference basis for propagation experiments. All modes are permitted

Barbados

In Barbados, the regulator permits operation from 5250 - 5400 kHz on USB Voice, maximum power 100W PEP ( Source:- The Telecoms Unit of the Barbados Government - Spectrum Management Handbook)

Canada

Prior to a full allocation, since the start of April 2012, Canadian amateurs have been invited to apply for a special interim developmental licence for 5 MHz / 60m, under the VX9 callsign series, by their regulator, Industry Canada (IC). The channels and conditions are identical to the current US 60m allocation. Following from their discussions with Radio Amateurs of Canada (the national society) and the implementation in March of the new FCC 60m Rules in the US, IC will publish a consultation document for radio amateurs in the official Canada Gazette. At the successful conclusion of this consultation period the current 60m allocation will be made generally available as part of the requisite Canadian amateur radio licences. In the meantime, the above offer of an interim special developmental licence is meant to provide for early access to the 60m channels available. Prior to this, 5 MHz/60m activity from Canada had been on a special permission, limited-time basis on specified frequencies. This had originated as early as 2003.

Industry Canada will allow amateur radio operators to use the 5332 kHz, 5348 kHz, 5358.5 kHz, 5373 kHz and 5405 kHz frequencies on a no-interference, no-protection basis, 2.8 kHz bandwidth, same modes as U.S., 100W PEP maximum power. (source: VE3QN 22 Jan 14)

Cayman Islands

Channelized operation on centre frequencies 5332.0, 5348.0, 5358.5, 5373.0 and 5405.0 kHz. The corresponding USB voice ‘dial’ frequencies are: 5330.5, 5346.5, 5357.0, 5371.5 and 5403.5 kHz. Maximum bandwidth 2.8 kHz, Maximum Power: 100W PEP ERP referenced to a half-wave dipole. Wide and narrowband datamodes are permitted, designators 2K80J2D (Example: Pactor III or Packet) and 60H0J2B (Example: PSK31) respectively. CW, designator 150HA1A, may also be used. The centre of all CW emissions must coincide with the authorized centre frequencies. Automatic operation is not permitted.

Dominican Republic

Channelized operation, centred on 5260, 5280, 5290, 5368, 5373, 5400 and 5405 kHz on a Secondary, non-interference basis. The corresponding USB voice ‘dial’ frequencies are as follows: 5258.5, 5278.5, 5288.5, 5366.5, 5371.5, 5398.5 and 5403.5 kHz. CW is also permitted.

Greenland

Greenland allows channelized operation on 5258.5, 5278.5, 5288.5, 5366.5, 5371.5, 5398.5 and 5403.5 kHz. USB voice, CW and Datamodes are permitted.

Grenada

Band allocation 5250 – 5450 kHz, providing for both VFO and Channelized operations. Their General licensees are permitted up to 500W p.e.p. and Advanced licensees 1 kW p.e.p. Modes include SSB and CW.

New Zealand

Frequencies: 5320 and 5394 kHz USB Internal AR Emercomms- AREC* assist (NZ SAR services). *AREC = New Zealand’s Amateur Radio Emergency Corps. More information at http://www.nzart.org.nz/council/policies/2009-access-to-5-mhz/ (Updated: G3PSM Nov 2012)

St. Lucia

Channelized operation on centre frequencies 5332.0, 5348.0, 5358.5, 5373.0 and 5405.0 kHz. The corresponding USB voice ‘dial’ frequencies are: 5330.5, 5346.5, 5357.0, 5371.5 and 5403.5 kHz. Maximum bandwidth 2.8 kHz, Maximum Power: 100W PEP ERP referenced to a half-wave dipole. Wide and narrowband datamodes are permitted, designators 2K80J2D (Example: Pactor III or Packet) and 60H0J2B (Example: PSK31) respectively. CW, designator 150HA1A, may also be used. The centre of all CW emissions must coincide with the authorized centre frequencies. Automatic operation is not permitted. (source St. Lucia NRTC).

Trinidad and Tobago

The band 5.250 to 5.450 MHz is allocated on a secondary basis to the Amateur service. Maximum output power 1.5KW (source 9Y4NED Nov 2012)

USA and dependencies

Frequencies: 5330.5 / 5346.5 / 5357/ 5371.5 / 5403.5
Power: 100 Watts ERP with 0 dBd antenna (Updated: G3PSM Nov 2012)

 

3500-3800 kHz

The 80 meter band

 

ITU Radio Regulations

Allocation to services

IARU Spectrum Requirement

The amateur service requires a common worldwide exclusive allocation of at least 300 kHz, and retention of the present additional shared allocations in Regions 2 and 3.

Considerations

This band is used extensively by radio amateurs for contacts over distances of up to 500 km during the day, and for distances of 2000 km and more at night. In many countries the band is heavily populated by networks of amateur stations providing training for emergency communications during disasters, and is heavily utilised during communications emergencies.

 

1 810 - 2 000 kHz

The 160 metre band

Download List of 160m allocations in IARU Region 1 (version 7-January 2015)

IARU Spectrum Requirement

In the vicinity of 1800 kHz, the amateur service requires an exclusive worldwide allocation of 100 kHz and an additional shared worldwide allocation of 100 kHz.

Considerations

This band is the only medium-frequency (MF) allocation to the amateur service. Its propagation characteristics allow short-range communications during daytime hours and medium and long-range communications during night-time hours. This band is particularly useful during sunspot minima, when the maximum usable frequency (MUF) is below 3500 kHz.

An increasing number of countries in Region 1 are authorising amateur operation above 1850 kHz on a low-power, not-to-interfere basis. There is reason to believe that the growing use of GNSS (GPS and GLONASS) positioning systems will render obsolete radiolocation systems operating in the band 1900–2000 kHz.

Footnotes

WRC-03 made the modifications to Article 5 footnotes for the band 1800-2000 kHz. For WRC-07, IARU seeks the removal of country names from 5.98. While the removal of country names from 5.99 is also desirable, the inclusion of a country name in 5.99 is preferable to its inclusion in 5.98.

FN 5.96

In Germany, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Georgia, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Malta, Moldova, Norway, Uzbekistan, Poland, Kyrgyzstan, Slovakia, the Czech Rep., the United Kingdom, the Russian Federation, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Ukraine, administrations may allocate up to 200 kHz to their amateur service in the bands 1 715-1 800 kHz and 1 850-2 000 kHz. However, when allocating the bands within this range to their amateur service, administrations shall, after prior consultation with administrations of neighbouring countries, take such steps as may be necessary to prevent harmful interference from their amateur service to the fixed and mobile services of other countries. The mean power of any amateur station shall not exceed 10 W. (WRC 03)

The changes to 5.96 are that Jordan was removed and Iceland was added.

FN 5.98

Alternative allocation: in Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Cameroon, the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, Eritrea, Spain, Ethiopia, Georgia, Greece, Italy, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Lithuania, Syrian Arab Republic, Kyrgyzstan, the Russian Federation, Somalia, Tajikistan, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Turkey and Ukraine, the band 1 810-1 830 kHz is allocated to the fixed and mobile, except aeronautical mobile, services on a primary basis. (WRC-12)

FN 5.99

Additional allocation: in Saudi Arabia, Austria, Iraq, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Uzbekistan, Slovakia, Romania, Slovenia, Chad and Togo the band 1 810-1 830 kHz is also allocated to the fixed and mobile, except aeronautical mobile, services on a primary basis. (WRC-12)

(Download the full IARU Region 1 160m Bandplan - Rev 11 Dec 2010)

472 - 479 kHz

The 630 metre band

Download the 630 metre band file

WRC-2012 decided to allocate 472 - 479 to the amateur service on a secondary basis. So far the following administrations have allocated this band to the amateur service:

Bulgaria: Effective 12th February 2014 Bulgarian radio amateurs may use 472-479 kHz.

Denmark: Effective 1 January 2013.

France: From March 13th 2014 French radio amateurs in Mainland France and Overseas Territories in ITU Region 2 are allowed to use the band 472-479 kHz with 1 Watt EIRP.

Germany: The German administration (BNetzA) informed in an official gazette, that effective 13 June 2012 German radio amateurs with licence class A may use the band 472-479 kHz (in anticipation of the normally needed changes in the National Frequency Allocation Table). Power limit is 1 watt e.r.p , max. bandwidth 800 Hz.

Iceland: The radio amateur service is allocated 472-479 kHz with effective from 16th January 2013.

Italy: From January 2013 Italian radio amateurs may use 472-479 kHz on a secondary basis with a power not exceeding 1 Watt.

Malta: The radio amateur service allowed from May 2012 on a secondary basis with power not exceeding 1 Watt.

Monaco: The "Direction des Communications Electroniques" of the Principality of Monaco, by official letter of May 18th 2012, has allocated the segment 472 - 479 kHz, to the amateur service with secondary status, with a maximum power of 1 (one) Watt e.i.r.p.

Netherlands: Effective 1 January 2013 with 100 Watts PEP.

Norway: From October 31st 2012 Norwegian radio amateurs may use 472-479 kHz with up to 100 Watts output but maximum power emitted of 1 Watt EIRP  .

Poland: Polish radio amateurs may use 472-479 kHz with up to 1 Watt EIRP from February 2014.

Switzerland: Effective 1st January 2013 Swiss radio amateurs may use 472-479 kHz with up to 5 Watts EIRP.

United Kingdom: Effective 1st January 2013 is allocated to the amateur service with a permitted power of up to 5 Watts EIRP.

 

Historical Notes:

Belgium: On 15 January 2008 UBA received notice from BIPT that the segment 501-504 kHz is allocated on a secondary basis CW only (all speeds, so including QRSS). Power limitation is 5 Watt ERP.

Croatia: Croatia issues experimental licences for VFO based operations in the band 493-510 kHz in A1A mode (June 2010) The license is for one year.

Czech Republic: A special licence for an experimental beacon with callsign OK0EMW is issued and is valid until 13th August 2011. Frequency 505.06 kHz, power 1 W ERP.   Additionally, permission has been granted to OK2BVG to operate between 501-504 kHz using a maximum output of 20 W ERP.   This permission is good until the 1st September 2011 but is renewable.

Denmark: OZ8NJ received an experimental permit for 501-504 kHz and 20 W ERP.

Germany: Six experimental beacon stations are active on 505.1 kHz with a power of 9 W ERP. In a formal sense these beacons are experimental stations and not amateur stations.

Iceland: On February 19, 2010 The Post and Telecom Administration in Iceland granted a temporary experimental access to the 600 meter band in Iceland. The permit was valid until December 31, 2010,and now extended to 31 December 2012 . Frequency span: 493-510 kHz. Access is granted on secondary basis. CW only. Power limit is 100 W. Licensees need to apply to the PTA for a special license. The experimental license is open to both “N” and “G” license classes.

Ireland: In June of 2009 the IRTS was granted a Test Licence under which the Society could grant permission to operate on 501-504 kHz to a limited number of applicants on the basis of expressions of interest from those concerned which were approved by the Regulator, the Commission for Communications Regulation (ComReg). This arrangement has now been extended until June 2012 and ten amateur stations have been granted permission under this arrangement using CW and PSK31 with a maximum power of 10 dBW. 

Malta: The latest version of the Maltese National Frequency Plan contains an entry for 501-504 kHz with the following footnote (MLT03): The allocation of the band 501-504 kHz to the amateur service is valid until 31 December 2011.   Stations in the amateur service using this frequency band shall not exceed a maximum effective radiated power of 10 Watts (10 dBW) and shall not cause harmful interference to services operating in the same or adjacent frequency bands.   Transmission in this band shall be limited to experimental or research.

Netherlands: Full licence amateurs opted for an experimental permit to conduct experiments in the band 501-504 kHz with a maximum power of 5 W EIRP and a maximum bandwitdth of 100 Hz. The experiments started on 1 January 2010 and continued until 31 December 2010. The permission was extended from 28 January - 1 April 2011. Following a public consultation the National Allocation Table was changed on 24 June 2011. The band 501-505 kHz is allocated to the amateur service on a secondary basis until 1 January 2014. After WRC-12 this date was changed to 1 January 2013.

Norway: 493-510 kHz is allocated to the amateur service on a secondary basis with an output of 100 Watts.

Portugal: A permit may be obtained to carry out propagation tests using a maximum of 25W ERP between 495-505 kHz on a Secondary (Non Interference Basis) until 31st December 2011.   Modes permitted are A1A, F1B, G1D and J2B with ba maximum bandwidth of 100 Hz.

Slovenia: Special permit issued to S52AB on 8th August 2011 for operation between 501 - 505 kHz until 31st December 2011.

Sweden: Four stations now have a special permit to transmit in the band 501 - 507 kHz on a secondary basis. Maximum power is 20 W ERP. In a formal sense these transmitters are experimental stations and not amateur stations. These stations have a license to the end of 2011.

Spain: Six stations are authorized to use the band 501-504 kHz until 31 May 2011 with a bandwidth of 100 Hz and a power of 5 Watts. Update requested.

United Kingdom: From 1 March 2009 the United Kingdom allows amateur activity in the range 501-504 kHz with a maximum power of +10 dBW. A Notice of Variation is required.   This agreement runs until the 29th February 2012.

 

Status of 500 kHz allocations outside Region 1

Canada: In november 2008 Industry Canada has accepted an RAC proposal whereby selected Canadian radio amateurs would be permitted to operate in the vicinity of 500 kHz. As of October 2009 licences in the Developmental Service have been issued in the range 504-509 kHz.

  • VE1ZZ has been assigned VX9PSO on 504.6 kHz
  • VO1NA has been assigned VX9MRC on 507.77 kHz

New ZealandFrom 1 March, NZ Amateurs will have access to some of the spectrum that was previously used for Morse code communications with ships. The new band, 505 to 515 kHz has been granted on a temporary basis pending an international allocation to radio amateurs and includes some restrictions:

 

  • These frequencies are, or may be, allocated for use by other services. Amateur operators must accept interference from, and must not cause interference to, such other services.
  • Radiated power must not exceed 25 watts e.i.r.p.
  • The bandwidth of emissions must not exceed 200 Hz

http://www.nzart.org.nz/policies/2010-access-to-600m.html

USA: A two-year authorization for approximately 20 stations permits experimentation and research between 505 and 510 kHz using narrowband modes at power levels of up to 20 W ERP. Another authorization for five stations permits experimentation and research between 505 and 515 kHz at power levels of up to 200 W ERP

135.7 – 137.8 kHz

The 2 200 metre band

Download the 2 200 meter band (file to be updated)

IARU Spectrum Requirement

At WRC-07 IARU succeeded to fulfil its requirement for a worldwide, shared LF allocation below 200 kHz.

Considerations

This frequency range has characteristics quite unlike those of higher frequencies, and there is considerable interest in LF propagation and experimentation by individuals.

Situation in Region 1

Co-ordinated efforts by IARU Region 1 led to the adoption in May 1997 by the CEPT European Radiocommunications Committee of Recommendation 62-01:

CEPT REC 62-01

This frequency range has characteristics quite unlike those of higher frequencies, and there is considerable interest in LF propagation and experimentation by individuals. At the present time, there is no ITU global or regional allocation to the amateur service in the low-frequency (LF) band. Co-ordinated efforts by IARU Region 1 led to the adoption in May 1997 by the CEPT European Radiocommunications Committee of Recommendation 62-01:

“1) that the band 135.7 – 137.8 kHz may be used with a maximum e.r.p. of 1 watt on a secondary basis by the Amateur Service in CEPT countries.”

The status of implementation is as follows (last update: 25 January 2017)

ECO Frequency Information System (EFIS) see at: http://www.efis.dk/

Country
Implementation according to EFIS
Implementation according to other sources
Albania
Yes
 
Andorra
Yes
URA: yes
Austria
Yes
Frequenznutzungsplan and Amateurfunkgesetzes
Azerbaijan
 
 
Belarus
Yes
BFRR: yes 1 Watt ERP
Belgium
Yes
National Allocation Table
Bosnia & Herzegovina
No info
Not in National Allocation Table
Bulgaria
Yes
National Frequency Plan. National Footnote 71
Croatia
Yes
Planned www.nn.hr
Cyprus
No info
CARS: yes
Czech Republic
Yes
National Allocation Table National Footnote CZ3
Denmark
Yes
National Frequency Plan
Estonia
Yes
National Radio Frequency Allocation Plan
Finland
Yes
National Frequency Plan
France
Yes
National Allocation Table Footnote F002a
FY Rep of Macedonia
No Info
 
Georgia Yes  
Germany
Yes
Frequenzbereichszuweisungsplan. Footnote 3
Greece
No info
Hungary
Yes
National Allocation Table National Footnote H10
Iceland
Yes
National Table of Frequency Allocations
Ireland
Yes
Not in National Allocation Table. Special permits reported
Italy
Yes
National Allocation Table National Footnote 8
Kosovo Yes  
Latvia
Yes
Special permits reported
Liechtenstein
Yes
National Allocation Table
Lithuania
Yes
National Radio Frequency Allocation Table
Luxemburg
Yes
Plan d'allocation, d'attribution et d'assignation des fréquences
Malta
Yes
permitted since 01.01.09
Moldova
Yes
 
Monaco
 
ARM: yes
Montenegro Yes  
Netherlands
Yes
Nationaal Frequentie Plan
Norway
Yes
National Allocation Table
Poland
No Info
National Allocation Table National Footnote POL.1
Portugal
Yes
 
Romania
Yes
 
Russian Federation
no info
San Marino
 
 
Serbia
Yes
Not in National Allocation Table
Slovakia
Yes
National Table of Frequency Allocations
Slovenia
Yes
Spain
Yes
Cuadro Nacional de Atribución de Frecuencias. National Footnote UN-108
Sweden
Yes
 
Switzerland
Yes
National Frequency Allocation Plan
Turkey
No Info
Not in National Allocation Table
Ukraine
No Info
 
United Kingdom
Yes
National Allocation Table National Footnote UK7
Vatican City
No info
 

 

Situation in Region 2

Argentina, Canada and the United States have issued experimental licenses in the band 135.7–137.8 kHz.

Some administrations issue experimental licenses to amateurs or otherwise permit LF low-power operation; for example, in 160–190 kHz in the USA.

In a spectrum study, the USA administration approved, in principle, an ARRL requirement for a shared allocation in the vicinity of 160–190 kHz. Subsequently, the ARRL petitioned the FCC for secondary allocations in the bands 135.7–137.8 kHz and 160–190 kHz. In 2002, the FCC issued a Notice of Proposed Rule Making requesting public comment on a proposal to allocate the band 135.7–137.8 kHz to the amateur service while not proposing allocation of the band 160–190 kHz. In 2003, the FCC issued a Report and Order on several spectrum allocations for the Amateur Services but declined to allocate the band 135.7-137.8 kHz. There was substantial opposition to an amateur LF allocation from power companies which alleged that amateur transmissions would cause harmful interference to power-line carrier systems operating in that frequency range. However, the FCC did offer the possibility of authorising a number of experimental licenses.

Domestically in the USA, studies continue on compatibility of the Amateur Service with power-line carrier communications in the band 135.7-137.8 kHz including testing on an experimental license basis.

Region 2 (Guatemala City, 2001) urged its member-societies to support a coordinated approach to secondary allocations to the Amateur Service in the bands 135.7-137.8 kHz and 160-190 kHz.

In CITEL, Canada introduced an Inter-American Proposal to WRC-03 for a similar allocation by footnote in Region 2. Instead, WRC-03 decided to establish agenda item 1.15 for WRC-07, which reads:

1.15 to consider a secondary allocation to the amateur service in the frequency band 135.7-137.8 kHz.

 

Situation in Region 3

Australia and New Zealand have issued experimental licenses in the band 135.7–137.8 kHz.

Some administrations issue experimental licenses to amateurs or otherwise permit LF low-power operation; for example, in 165–190 kHz in Australia. In New Zealand in 1990, after negotiations by NZART, the band 165–190 kHz became available to radio amateurs with a special permit. In 2001 the permit requirement was removed and the band is now listed as an amateur band.

Region 3 (Darwin, 2000) recommended that an LF band segment of 15 kHz between 165 and 190 kHz and/or 135.7-137.8 kHz be sought through local administrations throughout Region 3 noting the international communications experiments that have taken and could take place. Region 3 (Taipei, 2004) updated this recommendation, referring to “in the vicinity of 180 kHz” instead of 165-190 kHz.

EHF

EHF covers 30-300 GHz